Dairy-free Mashed Potatoes

These dairy-free mashed potatoes are super creamy, don’t use any unusual ingredients, and are paleo, vegan and Whole30-friendly.

Let me start by saying that if you can have dairy and don’t want to follow the recipe below, you can check out my Red-skinned Mashed Potatoes. It’s just like this recipe, but with red potatoes and filled with butter and cream.

There are a load of vegan mashed potato recipes out there. A lot of them use vegan butter, which I’m not a fan of. I usually don’t like and can’t have the ingredients in them.

Some recipes use vegan cream cheese, which I’m also not a fan of. I also think it has a weird aftertaste.

So my challenge was to come up with a healthy mashed potatoes recipe, just as delicious as regular mashed potatoes, that doesn’t have those vegan dairy-replacement products and that doesn’t taste like coconut oil/milk. I’ve finally succeeded! :D

No coconut taste!

My first issue was the coconut taste. I used to use coconut milk in place of all the milk, but the result is some coconutty-tasting mashed potatoes.

So now I use a 50/50 mix of coconut milk and another dairy-free milk. If you don’t mind coconut flavor, you can definitely use all coconut milk instead of a 50/50 mix.

I use cashew milk, just because I prefer the taste over almond milk. Even if you use almond milk, you really can’t taste it in the mashed potatoes.

If you think mashed potatoes with cashew or almond milk sounds odd, you can also use another dairy-free milk in place of the almond milk. I imagine that anything unsweetened would work.

Though maybe hazelnut milk would taste strange? It’s just a guess.

Butter replacement

For the fat, I used a 50/50 mix of olive oil and coconut oil. There’s so much garlic in these mashed potatoes that the coconut flavor from the coconut oil is totally covered up, even if you used unrefined (extra virgin) coconut oil.

If you don’t want to use garlic but don’t want any coconut taste, be sure to use refined coconut oil (which doesn’t have any coconut flavor/smell to it).

Not using vegan butter also means these non-dairy mashed potatoes are Whole30 and paleo-friendly!

What potatoes to use

As for the potato type, Yukon Gold are the best. Even better than Russets, which would be the second-best choice.

Yukon Gold are never mealy, naturally creamy, and have a slight buttery flavor, which is especially nice when we’re making dairy-free mashed potatoes.

But do not use waxy potatoes! Some examples are new potatoes and fingerlings. That will result in some gluey mashed potatoes.

How to prevent starchy mashed potatoes

If you just dump the potatoes in a pot and boil them, it might work. But they could come out gummy. They often did for me.

I did a ton of reading and experimenting last year to find the best ways to prevent that issue. By following these tips, you’ll get the creamiest mashed potatoes. Here’s what to do.

Cut and then rinse the potatoes

Here’s something I’m guessing that a lot of us don’t do. Rinse the potatoes after you’ve cut them. That gets rid of any excess starch, which is one of the things that causes gummy mashed potatoes.

Steam the potatoes

When you boil your potatoes, they can easily get water-logged. And if your potatoes are water-logged, then they can’t absorb the milk and butter as they should.

That’s definitely not a problem with steaming! Potatoes are also less easy to overcook when you steam them.

Also, be sure to steam your potatoes until they’re very tender so that they’re easy to mash. Sometimes I’m in a hurry and think, “Eh, they’re soft enough. I’ll just mash them really well.”

Nope. That doesn’t work. The uncook parts will remain uncooked and you’ll have lumps. And overbeaten potatoes, which means gummy potatoes.

“Dry” the potatoes after steaming

After you remove the potatoes from the steamer insert, drain the water. Then put the potatoes back in the pot and on the burner, without the lid, for a few minutes. Shake the pot a few times.

This also helps with the above-mentioned water-logging issue (which isn’t really an issue if you steam them).

Coating in fat

Adding the coconut oil or olive oil to the steamed and “dried potatoes” will coat the starches which are in the potatoes, which then prevents the starches from interacting with the water in the milk. This helps keep the mashed potatoes creamy, smooth and fluffy, rather than gummy and heavy.

Don’t let the potatoes sit around

I’ve done this so, so many times. And maybe it isn’t true for all types of potatoes but whenever I let the cooked potatoes just sit around for a while before mashing, the mashed potatoes come out absolutely terrible.

So – steam your potatoes and then mash your potatoes. Don’t get distracted and forget about them!

Best method for mashing

It’s really essential not to overmash the potatoes. If you do, you’ll end up with gluey mashed potatoes.

I used to only use a hand mixer to mash them, but I recently switched to using a potato masher. I use that to mash them as much as I can and then switch to a hand mixer to make them super creamy and lump-free.

Important note! After adding the last bit of the liquid mixture, the potatoes are incredibly soupy-looking. Look at the video at 1:05.

Just continue with the mashing and they become fluffy and perfect.

Some people say using a potato ricer or a food mill will give you the best results. They’re both too time-consuming and messy for me, and I love the results with the potato masher + hand mixer, so I haven’t tried it.

Follow the directions, please. :D

I know it sounds odd, but potatoes are quite different from country to country. So I had a few people test these.

For me and my other recipe testers in Europe, they came out perfectly. One of my US recipe testers said that they were gummy. But she also only used 1/2 or 2/3 of the milk mixture because she didn’t think they needed so much. But they definitely do!

Then I had a few more people in the US test them, and they all said the same. They’re fantastic! So. Please follow the directions and you’ll be good. :)

I’ve made these twice a month for the past year and never have issues.

Questions about this recipe?

  • What can I use instead of canned coconut milk?

    Your potatoes wouldn’t be as rich or fluffy without the canned coconut milk. There’s not another similar plant-based milk that’s as fatty or that whips up the same as coconut milk.

    I’ve tried it and wouldn’t recommend it. If you don’t want to use coconut milk, I recommend finding another recipe.

  • Do I have to use the garlic?

    Nope, but I definitely think these mashed potatoes are tastier with it. You could also use granulated garlic or garlic powder and add to taste!

    Note that if you omit the garlic and use unrefined coconut oil, you will have some coconut taste to your potatoes. So it’s better to use refined coconut oil in that case.

  • What can I use instead of coconut oil and olive oil?

    I don’t recommend using all olive oil or all coconut oil or another type of oil for taste reasons. You could replace either oil with vegan butter (if you’re not paleo or Whole30).

    You could also replace both oils with vegan butter. I, unfortunately, can’t think of another dairy-free sub that would actually taste good!

  • Can I reduce the amount of fat?

    I think you could probably get by with 1/2 cup (instead of 3/4 cup). If you want to try, have the other 1/4 cup on hand in case you decide you need it after all.

Other Dairy-free Recipes:

  • I’m posting these dairy-free mashed potatoes right around Thanksgiving, so if you’re looking for other dairy-free recipes, I happen to have a few that would work well for the holidays but are also great any time of year.

  • This Dairy-free Cornbread is soft and sweet, and easy to make. It yields the perfect amount for Thanksgiving but can be halved for weeknight meals. It can easily be made ​​vegan and gluten-free.

  • This Dairy-free Banana Bread is amazing! It’s the perfect morning treat without any odd ingredients. Full of banana flavor + a little cinnamon.

    If you need a gluten-free version, try this Gluten-free Banana Bread or for a grain-free, paleo version, try these Almond Flour Banana Muffins, they both have dairy-free options.

  • This rich and creamy Crustless Pumpkin Pie is super easy and tastes terrific. There’s no flour, so it’s naturally gluten-free with keto and paleo options.

  • These Air Fryer Apples are super easy and tasty. They’re like sauteed apples but made in the air fryer.

    They’re maple-sweetened with vanilla and cinnamon and quick to make. With dairy-free, paleo and vegan options. If you don’t have an air fryer, try these Healthier Sauteed Apples. Apple Cider Mimosa Recipe is a fabulous cocktail for the season. Here’s to family and friends and a happy holiday season. Cheers!

If make these Dairy-free Mashed Potatoes, I would love to see pictures 📸! Just tag #texanerin 📣🤩 on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter so I can easily find them. Enjoy!

Dairy-free Mashed Potatoes (paleo, vegan, Whole30)

♥♥♥♥♥
Rated 5.0 by 6 readers
Dairy-free Mashed Potatoes
  • Prep Time:
  • Cook Time:
  • Ready in:
  • Yield: 8-12 servings

Ingredients

  • 3 pounds (1360 grams) starchy potatoes (Yukon gold are best, followed by Russet)
  • 3/4 cup (175 ml) plant-based milk (use whatever you want, I like cashew milk)
  • 3/4 cup (175 ml) canned full-fat coconut milk
  • 5 garlic cloves, crushed or minced
  • 6 tablespoons olive oil
  • 6 tablespoons (84 grams) coconut oil
  • 2-2 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • black pepper and chives as garnish, optional

Directions

  1. Peel the potatoes and cut into 1" chunks.
  2. Put the potatoes in a large pot and cover with cold water, making sure the potatoes are covered with at least 1" of water.
  3. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium-low to keep the potatoes at a simmer. Simmer for about 10-14 minutes or until the potatoes are tender.
  4. Meanwhile, in a small saucepan over low heat, add the almond milk, coconut milk, garlic, olive oil, coconut oil and salt (I recommend using 2 teaspoons and adding more later, if desired). Once it's all melted, turn the heat off (but keep the saucepan on the stove so it stays warm).
  5. Drain the potatoes and return the pot (with the potatoes in it) back to the stove. Let any remaining moisture cook off for 1-3 minutes, shaking the pot occasionally. This helps with the texture of the mashed potatoes.
  6. Mash the potatoes with a potato masher, food mill or ricer and gradually add the milk mixture, bit by bit (while also tasting to see if you want more salt), until well combined with the potatoes. The more you mess with the potatoes, the gummier they'll be. I used a potato masher, then added the liquid, and once I couldn't get any further with the masher (the mashed potatoes looked very, very soupy) and I couldn't get out any more lumps, I switched to a hand mixer and used that just a bit until the lumps were totally gone and the potatoes were fluffy and not at all soupy.
  7. Serve with black pepper and chives.
  8. Cover cooled mashed potatoes and refrigerate for up to 4 days.

Recipe by  | www.texanerin.com

Dairy-free Mashed Potatoes (paleo, vegan, Whole30)

♥♥♥♥♥
Rated 5.0 by 6 readers
Dairy-free Mashed Potatoes
  • Prep Time:
  • Cook Time:
  • Ready in:
  • Yield: 8-12 servings

Ingredients

  • 3 pounds (1360 grams) starchy potatoes (Yukon gold are best, followed by Russet)
  • 3/4 cup (175 ml) plant-based milk (use whatever you want, I like cashew milk)
  • 3/4 cup (175 ml) canned full-fat coconut milk
  • 5 garlic cloves, crushed or minced
  • 6 tablespoons olive oil
  • 6 tablespoons (84 grams) coconut oil
  • 2-2 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • black pepper and chives as garnish, optional

Directions

  1. Peel the potatoes and cut into 1" chunks.
  2. Put the potatoes in a large pot and cover with cold water, making sure the potatoes are covered with at least 1" of water.
  3. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium-low to keep the potatoes at a simmer. Simmer for about 10-14 minutes or until the potatoes are tender.
  4. Meanwhile, in a small saucepan over low heat, add the almond milk, coconut milk, garlic, olive oil, coconut oil and salt (I recommend using 2 teaspoons and adding more later, if desired). Once it's all melted, turn the heat off (but keep the saucepan on the stove so it stays warm).
  5. Drain the potatoes and return the pot (with the potatoes in it) back to the stove. Let any remaining moisture cook off for 1-3 minutes, shaking the pot occasionally. This helps with the texture of the mashed potatoes.
  6. Mash the potatoes with a potato masher, food mill or ricer and gradually add the milk mixture, bit by bit (while also tasting to see if you want more salt), until well combined with the potatoes. The more you mess with the potatoes, the gummier they'll be. I used a potato masher, then added the liquid, and once I couldn't get any further with the masher (the mashed potatoes looked very, very soupy) and I couldn't get out any more lumps, I switched to a hand mixer and used that just a bit until the lumps were totally gone and the potatoes were fluffy and not at all soupy.
  7. Serve with black pepper and chives.
  8. Cover cooled mashed potatoes and refrigerate for up to 4 days.

Recipe by  | www.texanerin.com

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6 comments on “Dairy-free Mashed Potatoes” — Add one!

6 comments are awaiting moderation!

  • Jamie
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    says
    November 15, 2021 @ 6:55 am

    This was so creamy and we didn’t miss the dairy at all. The coconut milk is such a great idea for mashed potatoes!

    Reply
  • Marie
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    says
    November 15, 2021 @ 4:19 am

    I always make mashed potatoes with olive oil, but now that I’ve seen you using coconut milk I’m obsessed! Your mashed potatoes are amazingly creamy and delicious. A bright combination of ingredients!

    Reply
  • Veronika Sykorova
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    says
    November 12, 2021 @ 5:28 pm

    I love cashew milk for mashed potatoes too! I did once actually use hazelnut milk because i didn’t realize that’s all I had until everything else was ready lol. It was slightly weird but I surprisingly wasn’t even that bad haha!

    Reply
  • Lauren Michael Harris
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    says
    November 12, 2021 @ 2:17 pm

    I never would have thought to use coconut milk, but I love it! What a great way to make mashed potatoes!

    Reply
  • Leslie
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    says
    November 11, 2021 @ 8:28 pm

    This is a great recipe for dairy-free mashed potatoes! A must try especially if you’re dairy-free!

    Reply
  • Gloria
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    says
    November 8, 2021 @ 3:45 pm

    Mashed potatoes are always a hit on the dinner table. These look creamy and delicious. Just in time for all the holiday dinners.

    Reply

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